Editorial

January, 2012

Editorial

CB 12 Wrong on Group Home

Community Board 12 members are up in arms over an application by Birch Family Services to open a group home. Birch is seeking to create a home for six autistic 21-year-olds. Comment.

December, 2011

Editorial

Take a Second Look

There are a few reasons why the city should not go forward with plans to open a garbage transfer station on the waterfront in College Point. One of the strongest is that the flocks of birds attracted to the garbage will endanger planes landing at and taking off from nearby LaGuardia Airport. Comment.
Editorial

Tidings of Comfort and Joy

The Queens publishing family wishes our readers a holiday season filled with joy and hope. Comment.
Editorial

Tidings of Comfort and Joy

The Queens publishing family wishes our readers a holiday season filled with joy and hope. Comments (17).
Editorial

Public School Hero

High school Coach Charles Granby last week became the first coach in the PSAL to win 700 games. It is a record likely to stand for many years. Comment.
Editorial

Welcome Film Crews

Community Board 2 Chairman Joe Conley wants to meet with Mayor Michael Bloomberg to discuss the problems that arise when film crews come to work in his district, which includes Long Island City, Sunnyside, Woodside and parts of Maspeth. Comments (2).
Editorial

No Stamp of Approval

We understand the U.S. Postal Service has found itself between a rock and a hard place. It is faced with the threat of bankruptcy. To keep that from happening, the USPS has decided to make cuts, limiting service and closing facilities deemed no longer necessary. Comment.
Editorial

Lowest Bidder Should Not Run Prisons

Despite the thinking that the private sector can do almost anything government does better and for less money, we remain uncomfortable with private companies running our prisons and jails. Case in point: the federal immigration detention center in Springfield Gardens. Comment.
Editorial

Community College Cup Is Half-Full

A report recently released by the Center for an Urban Future claims that city community colleges “are not yet delivering on all their potential.” And it reached this conclusion because, like other community colleges in the city, LaGuardia and Queensborough have only a 28 percent graduation rate. Comments (1).
Editorial

Boro Stands Against Bigotry

It was an event that should not have to happen in the 21st century. The most diverse borough in the city should be beyond the religious bigotry and racism that has surfaced in recent weeks. But ignorance is still a powerful force in Queens, and for that reason we applaud the gathering of 30 religious and political leaders at Flushing Town Hall. Comment.
Editorial

A Time to Heal

An NYPD departmental judge did what needed to be done when he recommended last week that Detective Gescard Isnora be removed from the police force for his role in the shooting of Sean Bell. Comment.
Editorial

Thank You to Givers

With the memory of Thanksgiving dinner surrounded by friends and family still fresh in our minds, it is appropriate for the overstuffed to give some thought to the people of southeast Queens, who spent their holiday preparing and serving holiday meals to the borough’s neediest. Comment.
Editorial

Welcome, Fairway

At a time when headlines are dominated by talk of a double-dip recession, record unemployment and the foreclosure crisis, the opening of the new Fairway in Douglaston is exciting news. Comment.
Editorial

Homeowners Are Not Alone

Thousands of Queens homeowners have defaulted on their mortgages and are facing the prospect of foreclosure. These families often feel abandoned and alone. Comment.

November, 2011

Editorial

‘A Terrific and Tireless Leader’

We routinely report on the activities of countless community leaders. Along the way, we have been impressed by the dedication of many we have met, but none more so than Pat Dolan, who died last week. Comment.
Editorial

Explaining to Do

A wave of published reports has raised questions not only about city Comptroller John Liu’s plans to run for mayor in 2013, but his fitness to complete his term as comptroller. As the city’s chief financial watchdog, the comptroller’s judgment must be beyond reproach. That may no longer be the case. Comment.
Editorial

‘A Terrific and Tireless Leader’

We routinely report on the activities of countless community leaders. Along the way, we have been impressed by the dedication of many we have met, but none more so than Pat Dolan, who died last week. Comment.
Editorial

The Immigration Debate

Nothing is more certain to raise blood pressure in New York City than a discussion of the city’s handling of illegal immigration. This is evident in the response to Intro 656, a bill that would prevent the city Department of Correction from handing over suspected illegal immigrants to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for detention and deportation. Comments (8).
Editorial

Wacky CB 11 Show

If we had not seen this happen before, we might have thought it was a skit from “The Tonight Show” or “Saturday Night Live.” But our reporter says it really happened. He wrote that at last week’s Community Board 11 meeting, “Bedlam broke out” over a proposal to install bleachers at the Little League field in Crocheron Park. Comment.
Editorial

No Room for Hatred

In the dark of night, a vandal or vandals armed with a spray paint can committed a despicable act when they painted swastikas on two Queens libraries and a synagogue in Jackson Heights. Comment.
Editorial

The Electronic Nightmare

Cell phones play movies and music, send e-mail, access the Internet — and have turned South Jamaica into a war zone. Comments (1).
Editorial

Northeast Cup Is Half-Full

In his second annual town hall meeting, City Councilman Dan Halloran took aim at the city government, which he, of course, is a part of. He accused various elements of the government of neglect, malfeasance and outright neglect of his district. Comment.
Editorial

Feeling Lucky?

History was made Friday when Aqueduct Racetrack opened Resorts World Casino New York City. According to the casino operators, 65,000 people jammed the slot machines and gaming tables during the opening weekend while thousands of would-be gamblers waited in the cold for their chance to play. Comment.
Editorial

A Son of Queens Freed

It was not justice — not even close — but it was a welcome outcome nonetheless. Comment.

October, 2011

Editorial

Victory for Astorians

In these tough times, the U.S. Postal Service is faced with difficult decisions. The USPS was designed to be self-supporting and until now it was. Through the sale of postage and other services, it was able to cover salaries and overhead. Comment.
Editorial

Taking on Cyberbullying

Elected officials held a news conference at a Queens high school that they hope will raise public awareness about cyberbullying. Comment.
Editorial

Four Lives Gone

If only the two young men charged with the murder of Tyshanna “Chicken” Murphy looked like dangerous thugs, it would be easier to celebrate their arrests. But they do not. Tyshawn “Ta Ta” Brockington, 21, and Robert Cartagena, 20, look like a couple of guys from the neighborhood. Comments (1).
Editorial

The Fight to Save Southeast Queens

There are two pressing concerns in southeast Queens and they are directly connected: Putting people back to work and saving their homes. Comments (1).
Editorial

A Little Respect for the Community, Please

There has to be a point when the city tells developers enough. That point has come with the Millennium office building on Northern Boulevard in Flushing. Chon Property Corp., of Flushing, bought the building for $2.6 million in 2003 and has done nothing with it. Comment.
Editorial

Hurry Up and Wait

Hurry Up and Wait Comments (1).
Editorial

The Battered Wife

The Battered Wife Comment.
Editorial

Sunny News for Sunnyside

Sunny News for Sunnyside Comment.
Editorial

Alabama Rides Again

Alabama Rides Again Comment.
Editorial

The Diversity Dilemma

The Diversity Dilemma Comment.
Editorial

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs Comment.

September, 2011

Editorial

Is City Losing the War on Guns?

Is City Losing the War on Guns? Comment.
Editorial

After the Storm

After the Storm Comment.
Editorial

Ten Years Later

As the city prepares for the 10th anniversary of the attack on the World Trade Center, a thousand pundits will ask the question: How far have we come since that terrible day? Comment.

August, 2011

Editorial

For Whom the Toll Belts

It is easy to see why a skeptic might believe the whole debate over raising the tolls at Port Authority bridges and tunnels was scripted to make Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie look like heroes. Comment.
Editorial

Sanitation’s Bird-Brained Plan

In government, it is better when the right hand knows what the left hand is doing. Case in point: New York City and Queens birds. Comment.
Editorial

Hometown Heroes

In a summer with few highlights in the world of sports, two hometown heroes have given Queens sports fans something to cheer about. Comment.
Editorial

Moving toward the American Dream

With the support of state Sen. Malcolm Smith, Mayor Michael Bloomberg entered troubled waters last week when he announced an ambitious effort to address the disparity in the achievement of black and Latino young men compared with whites and Asians. The mayor announced the Young Men’s Initiative, which will target 40 city high schools that have already made progress in addressing the low graduation rates among Latinos and blacks. Comment.
Editorial

The Mad Hatter and the Tea Party

Bob Turner, the businessman running against state Assemblyman David Weprin in the race to replace former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner in the 9th District, says he is not a member of the Tea Party — although he welcomes its support. Comment.
Editorial

Say No

Republican Bob Turner is hoping he can win a tight race to fill the congressional seat left vacant by Anthony Weiner by exploiting the memory of the 9/11 tragedy. A commercial produced by this darling of the Tea Party movement with scenes of the devastation aired last week. It is reason enough for Queens voters to question his judgment. Comment.
Editorial

Memory of Sean Bell Lives On

Hats off to city Comptroller John Liu, who sent more than 30 interns to paint the exterior of the Sean Bell Community Service Center. Comment.
Editorial

‘I Dance for Them’

Last week we were reminded once again of the magnificent native American culture that once flourished in New York. Comment.
Editorial

Hard Times in Sunnyside

Two parking regulations are casting a shadow over small businesses on Queens Boulevard in Sunnyside. Comment.
Editorial

Search for Balance at the FDNY

For decades, city officials have recognized that blacks are not proportionately represented in the city’s firehouses. Although black leaders have occasionally accused the FDNY of discrimination, they have been unable to produce evidence that the disparity is intentional. Comment.

July, 2011

Editorial

A Sad Day for Public Education

A Manhattan judge has ruled that the mayor can move forward with his plan to close 22 city schools, including Jamaica and Beach Channel high schools. Comment.
Editorial

A Sign of the Times

Queensborough Community College has announced the launching of a major effort to reach out to the Asian Americans who now call Queens home. Asian Americans comprise 25 percent of the student body at the college. This effort recognizes the role Chinese, Koreans and other Asian Americans play in places like Flushing. Comment.
Editorial

High Tech Meets Humans

The system that monitors the traffic flow on the city’s roads is about to “take a quantum leap forward” by taking a long look back. Comment.
Editorial

Bringing Home the Bacon

We confess we are not comfortable with the concept of member items, even when they are used to benefit local programs. Each year, City Council members give out millions of dollars in grants to nonprofits in their home districts. The taxpayer funds are doled out according to a political formula that has nothing to do with the needs of the district but everything to do with political power. Comment.
Editorial

Buzz Off

This is yet another example of the misuse of power by a city agency. Comment.
Editorial

Road Rage

We doubt there are many drivers in Queens who, at one time or another, have not shouted a curse or flipped the bird to an inconsiderate motorist. Things can turn ugly fast, but in most cases the cars soon go their separate ways and the anger subsides. Comment.
Editorial

Redistricting Madness

A joint legislative panel has begun the challenging work of redrawing the state’s district lines following the 2010 census. The first meeting of the Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment took place last week, with the governor threatening to veto the redistricting if the lines were not fairly drawn. Comment.
Editorial

The Governor’s Next Battle

Once again, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has shown that he is a man of integrity not afraid to ruffle the feathers of the Democratic and Republican party bosses. Last week, he threatened to reject the final product of a joint legislative panel charged with redrawing the state’s district lines if the final result does not meet his standard for fairness. Comment.
Editorial

Starbucks to Queens: Drop Dead

We assume many of our readers are regulars at the 256 Starbucks scattered throughout Queens and the other boroughs. This is the nation’s most popular coffee shop and its customers think nothing of shelling out $5 or more for a Frappuccino or any of its other specialty drinks. Comment.
Editorial

Shining Light on Sex Offenders

A bill that would close loopholes that allow convicted sex offenders to escape notice in the community is on its way to becoming law. The legislation, written by state Sen. Tony Avella, has been passed by the Senate. Comment.
Editorial

World Peace: The Right Place to Begin

More than 40 years after the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, it is safe to say America has come a long way. Discrimination based on religion, race and gender is illegal and not tolerated. But while this was a historic accomplishment, it was only the beginning. The next step may be more difficult. Comment.
Editorial

‘Acceptance, Respect, Equality’

In celebrating the passage of the Marriage Equality Act, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said, “It’s acceptance, it’s respect, it’s equality.” Comment.

June, 2011

Editorial

Thrift Shop Has Big Heart

In 2011, there is evidence that autistic children can benefit dramatically from early intervention. But this intervention requires close attention by dedicated professionals, especially in the more difficult cases. This can be expensive. Comment.
Editorial

The Downfall of Anthony Weiner

Is it possible to be saddened by the downfall of U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner without in any way excusing his conduct? Is it possible a person could engage in unsavory conduct while in other ways serving his constituents well in Congress? We think so and admit we were not happy to watch Weiner’s resignation, even though we agree it was the right thing to do. Comment.
Editorial

McInsult

It seems like someone at McDonald’s headquarters fell asleep. An ad for the fast food chain that was supposed to be funny was insulting to the people who live in Far Rockaway. The McDonald’s poster on the A train suggests riders should drink the chain’s iced coffee or risk “falling asleep and ending up in Far Rockaway.” Comment.
Editorial

Who Should Decide?

Should U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner resign in the wake of the Twitter scandal? Should the House of Representatives force him to step down? Whose decision should it be? Comment.
Editorial

Walcott’s Dilemma

We have long been a fan of Dennis Walcott, a Cambria Heights resident, who was named city schools chancellor after serving as a deputy mayor. We believe Walcott is a man of integrity who understands the importance of public education better than his boss. And we are hoping he is uncomfortable with Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s plan to close Jamaica High School and replace it with two new schools with names created by a public relations firm. Comment.
Editorial

Twitterdumb

It took far too long, but U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner finally did the right thing. On Monday, the married congressman publicly apologized for sending a lewd picture of himself to a woman he met on the social networking site Twitter. To his shock, the picture of his bulging underwear was visible to thousands of people with access to his Twitter account. Comment.
Editorial

Let the Healing Begin

The family and friends of Sean Bell have succeeded in turning a terrible tragedy into an opportunity to build something of lasting value in southeast Queens. On a Sunday morning, they marched from the place where Bell died in a hail of bullets to the site of a community center that was built to honor his memory. Comment.
Editorial

Easy to Just Say ‘No’

Outside of outlawing puppies, there is nothing a mayor can do that is more certain to draw angry protests than the decision to close a firehouse. In May, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that four firehouses in Queens and 20 throughout the city have been targeted for closure because of the city’s budget cuts. Comment.

May, 2011

Editorial

Union Bashing at City Hall

The gloves came off last week in the fight to save 22 public schools, including Jamaica HS, put on the chopping block by Mayor Michael Bloomberg. In the end, the battle says more about the mayor and his subordinates than about the schools. Comment.
Editorial

The Terrorist Next Door

Nearly 10 years after the devastation on 9/11, Whitestoners are faced with the reality that the next terrorist could be the nice guys living next door. Comment.
Editorial

Poster Child for Recklessness

At age 46, Queens resident Sheila Bethea is the new poster child for the dangers of driving after drinking alcohol or abusing illegal drugs. Comment.
Editorial

Give This Proposal an F

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has joined Mayor Michael Bloomberg and others who say the scores on standardized tests should be a major factor in evaluating teacher performance in the city’s public school system. The scores would account for as much as 40 percent in determining which teachers will be retained and laid off. If the proposed system of evaluation goes into effect, it will replace the existing, seniority-based system. Comment.
Editorial

A New Day in NY Politics

Now that the results are in from the first national census of the 21st century, the state’s political bosses are salivating at the thought of redrawing district lines in a manner that will further partisan interests. Elected officials believe gerrymandering is a legitimate part of the democratic process. Comment.
Editorial

A Welcome Bump in the Road

Speed bumps are a pain. Even at 30 mph they can damage the bottom of a passenger car and spill the driver’s coffee. Nobody likes driving over a speed bump. Nevertheless, we are certain the people living along Maurice Avenue in Maspeth welcome the three new speed bumps put into place last week by the city Department of Transportation. Comment.
Editorial

New Approach to the Homeless Problem

City officials need to understand they do not have all the answers. Recently, Seth Diamond, commissioner for the Department of Homeless Services, took on the Coalition for the Homeless for a report in which it recommended the city place the homeless in unused apartments. Comment.
Editorial

The American Birthright

How ironic that the people who profess such loyalty to the Founding Fathers and the U.S. Constitution have launched a campaign hell-bent on subverting that document. Newsmax.com, an online voice of the conservative Tea Party movement, recently e-mailed a message to its subscribers on behalf of “NumbersUSA for Lower Immigration Levels,” one of its sponsors. Comment.
Editorial

Take a Hike, Curtis

Curtis Sliwa has good reason not to like the Gotti family. Sliwa, radio host and founder of the Guardian Angels, believes John Gotti Jr. tried to have him killed in June 1992. Sliwa was shot while sitting inside a taxi in Manhattan. Comment.
Editorial

For Queens, This Is Personal

The entire nation was shaken by the devastation Osama bin Laden unleashed Sept. 11, 2001, but nowhere was the pain more felt than in Queens. On that day, 76 ´╗┐Queens firefighters were killed as they bravely rushed into what was left of the Twin Towers. Many more Queens residents also died when bin Laden sent planes crashing into the World Trade Center. Comment.

April, 2011

Editorial

A Ray of Hope at Jamaica HS

More than 50 years after they graduated from Jamaica HS, The Cleftones, one of the great doo-wop groups, returned to their alma mater to plead with the city not to close the school that means so much to them. Comment.
Editorial

Time for Term Limits Has Come

In a recent speech at North Shore Towers, state Sen. Tony Avella spoke about a bill he has sponsored that would limit state legislators in the state Assembly and Senate to eight terms, or 16 years. This restriction, he argued, would make lawmakers more accountable to the people who sent them to Albany. Comment.
Editorial

‘A Culture of Corruption’

The mug shot of Alan Hevesi taken on his first day in prison was displayed last week on the front pages of the city’s tabloids. The man who as state comptroller was once one of the most powerful people in state government appeared pathetic and broken. Comment.
Editorial

Jamaica High on Life Support

There seems to be little hope that new city Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott will reverse the city Department of Education’s plan to close Jamaica HS. This closure is a key part of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s education agenda and Walcott supported that agenda as a deputy mayor. Comment.
Editorial

A Worthy Investment

At first blush, the city’s plan to invest $65 million on the expansion of the Queens Museum of Art may appear hard to justify. The groundbreaking for the cultural museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park took place at the same time the city is talking about laying off teachers. Comment.
Editorial

The Fat-Fast Food Cop

It was hard not to come to the conclusion last week that City Councilman Leroy Comrie is himself at times a few french fries short of a Happy Meal. Comment.
Editorial

‘Just a Guy from Queens’

Mayor Michael Bloomberg all but admitted last week that hiring Cathie Black to run the city schools was a mistake. He called a press conference last week to announce he and Black agreed that her resignation was in the best interest of the children attending city public schools. Comment.
Editorial

‘We Are Bryant’

One week before Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced the beheading of city Schools Chancellor Cathie Black, students and alumni of Bryant High School in Astoria and elected officials gathered to fight for the future of the school. Comment.
Editorial

Tell DOE: Put Down the Ax

Now that the city Department of Education has tasted blood, it appears nothing is going to stop it from chopping up Queens schools. The city Panel for Educational Policy voted 7-4 in March to halt freshman enrollment at IS 231 in Springfield Gardens. The DOE will phase out the old school and put two new schools — IS 355 and IS 356 — in its place. Comment.
Editorial

A Courageous Fighter Calls It a Day

On Wednesday of last week, one of the finest people ever to serve in the state Legislature abruptly announced her retirement. Nettie Mayersohn, 86, served in the state Assembly for 28 years. In her nearly three decades in Albany, she worked for the people of her district. During that time, her dedication and integrity have never been questioned. Comment.
Editorial

The Nonsensical Census

Despite the use of modern technology designed to ensure the accuracy of its count, the U.S. Census Bureau has reached a conclusion about population growth in Queens that defies common sense. According to the census, from 2000-10, the borough gained only 1,334 residents. Comment.

March, 2011

Editorial

Do Not Kill It, Fix It

This time it is the state Department of Education which has recommended closing August Martin High School in Jamaica. A commission’s report cites a “low incidence of higher order thinking activities” along with ineffective teaching and pervasive lateness. Comment.
Editorial

Historian Is a Treasure

In 1994, TimesLedger Newspapers’ publisher accepted the offer of Joan Brown Wettingfeld to write a column for the Bayside Times. For 30 years, Wettingfeld, a lifelong Bayside resident, and her father, the founder of the Bayside Historical Society, had been working to preserve the history of Bayside. It is safe to say Wettingfeld knows more about Bayside and the history of Queens than anyone. It has been our privilege to bring her column to our readers. Comment.
Editorial

‘An Eternal Slap in the Face’

The City Council wielded its rubber stamp in a 38-12 vote last week to approve a law proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to change the name of the Queensboro Bridge to the Ed Koch-Queensboro Bridge. Comment.
Editorial

More Scum in the Albany Pond

It seems there is no end to the political corruption in New York. Jamaica Hospital and its parent company, MediSys, announced last week that they removed President and CEO David Rosen after federal investigators charged that he paid bribes to three elected officials. Rosen had been president of the hospital since 1980. It is not clear how long he has been paying bribes. Comment.
Editorial

Rep. King’s Inquisition

The most poignant and only memorable moment in the recent congressional hearing looking into the radicalization of the American Muslim community came when a Minnesota congressman tearfully recalled the sacrifice of a young Bayside man who gave his life on 9/11. Comment.
Editorial

Another Victim of Mindless Hate

Police say a teenager attending a party in Woodhaven was beaten to death by five attackers who believed he was gay. The suspected thugs who killed Anthony Collao, 18, are accused of invading a home where they shouted anti-gay slurs. When Collao attempted to run, they chased him down and kicked and beat him to death, authorities say. Comment.
Editorial

A Modern-Day McCarthy

City Councilman Daniel Dromm knows what it is like to feel the sting of prejudice. Before becoming a Council member, he was a leading gay rights activist. Last week, Dromm took issue with hearings to be held in Washington, D.C., by U.S. Rep. Peter King intended to examine “The Extent of Radicalization in the American Muslim Community and that Community’s Response.” Comment.
Editorial

A Victory for Common Sense

From the get-go, it struck us as bizarre and sad that anyone would oppose the renovation and expansion of a Bayside hospital that provides cutting-edge care to children suffering from terrible illnesses. And yet, the Weeks Woodlands Association asked the city to block the expansion of St. Mary’s Healthcare System for Children. Comment.
Editorial

A Question of Fairness in Willets Point

The redevelopment of Willets Point will be a good thing for Queens. It will create middle-income housing and hundreds of jobs. It will generate tax revenues for a city still reeling from the recession and turn a junkyard into a thriving commercial area. Comment.
Editorial

IS 231 on Life Support

At least for the moment, the city Department of Education has put the execution of IS 231 on Springfield Boulevard on hold. The city Panel for Educational Policy voted to delay the phase-out until March 23. The same panel already has stopped new admissions to Jamaica and Beach Channel high schools. Comment.
Editorial

‘The Quality of Mercy’

In Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice,” Portia tells the court, “The quality of mercy is not strain’d,/It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven.” Borough Hall should remember this line when it considers the appeal made last week by Bayside’s Korean Central Presbyterian Church of Queens. Comment.
Editorial

Justice Denied

For five years a suspected pervert charged with sexually assaulting a 9-year-old girl in Astoria Park walked the streets after jumping his $50,000 bail. Peter Belgrinos was nabbed last week at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam when airport officials discovered there was an Interpol warrant for his arrest. Comment.
Editorial

Moving Forward at Aqueduct

It appears the company hired to turn Aqueduct Race Track into a casino is making the right moves. Resorts World New York said last month that more than a third of its massive contracts will go to Minority Women Business Enterprise ´╗┐businesses. Comment.
Editorial

Merit vs. Seniority

The debate over whether the city Department of Education should base teacher layoffs on seniority got hotter this week when a Quinnipiac Poll showed that 85 percent of the people who responded opposed the current policy of basing teacher layoffs on seniority. The respondents said they do not like the “last in, first out” policy. They want the best teachers retained. Comment.
Editorial

Slow Down

With respect to former Mayor Ed Koch, the proposal to rename the Queensboro Bridge is stupid. Known also as the “59th Street Bridge,” it connects Queens with Manhattan. Changing the name to the “Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge” is unacceptable. At best it is dumb; at worst it is an insult to Queensites. Comment.

February, 2011

Editorial

A Sad Day in the Baisley Park Houses

Last week, the city arrested 62 drug dealers in Queens. These dealers were reputedly members of dangerous gangs selling crack, cocaine, heroin, pot and pills in and near the Baisley Park Housing Development and Rochdale Village, according to the Queens DA. In some cases, they were peddling this poison near schools, playgrounds and daycare centers, he said. Some of those arrested are facing up to 25 years in prison if convicted on the most serious charges. Comment.
Editorial

Apologize, Rush

It has been nearly a month since radio host Rush Limbaugh insulted the people of China and their leader, but still there has been no apology. In making fun of the speech Chinese President Hu Jintao made during a White House visit, Limbaugh offended more than a billion people, including millions of Chinese Americans. Politicians and community leaders have condemned his comments. Comment.
Editorial

A New Beginning in Hunters Point

Just days before delivering a somber preliminary budget, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that a developer has been named and the city is moving forward with plans for the first phase of Hunters Point South. This will include retail space and 908 housing units, of which at least 75 percent will be affordable. If it happens, it will be the largest affordable housing development in the city since the early 1970s. Comment.
Editorial

Save the Mets

Could the New York Mets go broke? Two years after opening Citi Field, Mets co-owners Fred Wilpon and Saul Katz are on the brink of financial disaster because the team was built in large part with profits earned from investments made with Bernard Madoff. If that happens, it will not be just the Wilpons who suffer. Comment.
Editorial

Who Decides Who Should Go?

The thought that the city may be forced to lay off teachers in public schools is disturbing. Classes are already overcrowded. Nevertheless, if Gov. Andrew Cuomo cuts $1.5 billion in public school aid, the city may have no other choice. The mayor, the United Federation of Teachers and the City Council are hoping it does not come to that. It may be that there will be no other way to close the budget gap. Comment.
Editorial

This Fight Is Not Over

Last week the city Panel for Educational Policy voted to close 12 public schools despite the protests of more than 2,000 teachers, parents and students. This happens when a billionaire mayor whose daughter never saw the inside of a public school appoints a businesswoman from Connecticut whose children attended the most exclusive private schools to run your school system. Comment.
Editorial

Does this End Justify the Means?

This week the city will initiate an eminent domain process that will set the stage for the possible seizing of the property belonging to holdout landowners in Willets Point. The city is eager to begin the first phase of a redevelopment of a 62-acre site that lies between Citi Field and downtown Flushing. If things go as planned, the project will create 5,000 apartments and 1.7 million square feet of retail space. Comment.
Editorial

Save Jamaica High School

Only a month at her new job and city Schools Chancellor Cathie Black is on the brink of making a mistake of historic proportions. On Jan. 20, Black sent Deputy Chancellor John White to a meeting at Jamaica High to explain the city Department of Education’s plan to close the school that has been an institution in Queens for nearly 120 years. Comment.
Editorial

Raining on the Mayor’s Parade

The mayor reached deep in his 11th State of the City speech to bring a message of hope to a snow-covered city still reeling from the city’s failure following the December blizzard. He spoke of the billions the city will spend on capital projects in Queens, including the Hunters Point South housing development and the planned renovation of Willets Point. Comment.
Editorial

Power to the People

The day may come when all of Queens is powered by giant windmills. There will be no pollution and they will look a thousand times better than the power plants in western Queens that now keep the lights on in this borough. Comment.

January, 2011

Editorial

Changing Name Changes Nothing

The city Department of Education has announced that the Gateway program will be one of the schools that will replace Jamaica High School next year. Although a city councilman and state assemblyman from Fresh Meadows have praised the proposal, we remain unimpressed. You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig. Comment.
Editorial

‘Fine and Dandy’

At the RKO Keith’s Theatre in downtown Flushing, it is once again two steps forward and one step back. Comment.
Editorial

Short Term Pain, Long Term Gain

The state budget ax is about to fall and, barring some sort of miracle, Queens will feel its share of the pain. It is rumored that in his Feb. 1 budget address, Gov. Andrew Cuomo will call for the layoffs of 5,000 to 15,000 state workers. Comment.
Editorial

Wonder Bread Gives Queens the Shaft

Barring the sudden and unexpected growth of a conscience, Wonder Bread will close its doors in Jamaica this week, putting 200 men and women out of work. After 100 years of operating in southeast Queens, Wonder Bread is turning its back on it and its blue-collar workers. Comment.
Editorial

A Flawed but Backbreaking Effort

Lost in the anger over the city’s performance following the December blizzard is the fact that hundreds of city employees worked night and day to get the city back to normal. Sanitation employees worked 12-hour shifts to clear the snow and then overtime again to pick up trash. Comment.
Editorial

Stop the Hate-filled Rhetoric

There is no evidence that the man who shot and seriously wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and killed six other bystanders was directly influenced by the heated rhetoric that has dominated political discussion in recent years. This angry dialogue has reached a feverish pitch since the election of President Barack Obama, especially on right-wing talk radio. Comment.
Editorial

Welcome Chancellor Black

The time for questioning her credentials is over. Cathie Black became the new city schools chancellor last week and we wish her well. The challenge she faces is enormous. The schools already under-financed will face budget cuts as the mayor and City Council look for ways to balance the city budget. Comment.
Editorial

A Pervert Goes to School

A registered sex offender was allowed to volunteer at St. Mel’s School in Flushing exposes a critical flaw in the state Sex Offender Registration Act. Joseph Denice was allowed to volunteer as a religious instructor at the Catholic school. He was dismissed when it was learned Denice is a registered sex offender who only recently got out of jail where he served a six-month sentence for repeatedly abusing a 12-year-old boy. Comment.
Editorial

City Drops the Ball after the Blizzard

Sometimes the truth is embarrassing. Last Thursday afternoon, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that by Thursday morning every street in the city would be plowed at least once. That was 72 hours after the snow stopped falling and completely unacceptable. Comment.
Editorial

Blizzard Response Was a Disaster

More than 80 hours after the snow stopped falling in last week’s blizzard, many streets in northeast Queens had not been plowed. This powerful storm was not the worst the city has ever seen, but the response to this emergency may be the worst. Comment.
Editorial

An $80 million Oops

All eyes were focused at the end of 2010 on the Baysider who ran the agency that allowed the city to be swindled out of $80 million. Joel Bondy, executive director of the city Office of Payroll Administration, was suspended last month without pay. A few days later he announced his resignation effective Dec. 31. So far he has not been charged with any crime by federal prosecutors. Comment.
Editorial

A Better Idea for Jamaica High School

The bureaucrats in lower Manhattan want to close Jamaica High School and then reopen it with a new name. A teacher at this school has made a much more interesting suggestion. We hope the Department of Education is paying attention. Comment.
Editorial

Talk about Chutzpah

The girlfriend of former state Senator Hiram Monserrate is living proof that no-good-deed-goes-unpunished. Karla Giraldo has filed a $35 million lawsuit in Brooklyn federal court against the Queens district attorney’s office and the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System. She claims that LIJ doctors conspired with the police and DA officials to try to coerce her into implicating Monserrate in an assault. Comment.
CNG: Community Newspaper Group