Today’s news:

DOT summonses for sidewalks unfair to Queens homeowners

In October, I attended a community meeting at PS 203, organized by City Councilman David Weprin (D−Hollis), where various city agencies were in attendance, allegedly to answer community questions and concerns.

At the time, it seemed these officials were overly conscientious about alerting the community of the need to apply for a “construction permit” for any work being done on one’s property.

Fast forward to December and almost every house on my block, including my own, received a summons from the city Department of Transportation for “trip hazards” on our sidewalks. We will need to have entire sidewalks ripped out and replaced within 45 days, but first we have to apply and pay for a construction permit that will cost $75 at minimum.

Some of these sidewalks have no visible defects. Any work done without this permit is subject to a huge fine. This coming from an agency that has miles of crumbling infrastructure under its control. All one has to do is look at the rotting cement of the Clearview Expressway, with steel supports showing through the decayed cement.

This department has hubris to be concerned with my sidewalk. Once again, our elitist Mayor Michael Bloomberg has directed his agencies to hijack the homeowner. This is another money grab that comes after his latest tax grab.

David Gmuca

Oakland Gardens

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