Today’s news:

Maloney calls for high-speed rail in Northeast corridor

A northbound Amtrak Acela passes through Middle River, Md. U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney said high-speed trains should first be introduced in the Northeast. AP Photo/Rob Carr
TimesLedger Newspapers

Three members of Congress, including U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-Astoria), said the federal government must hasten the start of high-speed train service, which she said should be introduced first in the Northeast.

“High-speed rail makes the most sense here in the Northeast corridor, which has the densest population, the most congested roads and air space and the most interconnected cities in the nation,” Maloney said.

Maloney, Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House Transportation Committee, and Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) spoke at an all-day Conference on High-Speed Rail in Manhattan Tuesday.

“We must move as quickly as possible to build high-speed rail between New York, Boston and Washington. The time for delay is long past,” Maloney said.

High-speed rail trains have operated in much of Europe and Asia for years, greatly diminishing airline patronage between some cities, such as the route between Madrid and Barcelona.

The Amtrak super-express Acela can attain a top speed of 150 mph, but can reach that speed for only 12 miles between New York and Washington, D.C., because of the tracks and roadbed, which would have to be upgraded to accommodate high-speed service.

New York state received $354 million in federal money recently after the state of Florida rejected it.

Reach contributing writer Philip Newman by e-mail at timesledgernews@cnglocal.com or phone at 718-260-4536.

Pin It
Print this story Permalink

Reader Feedback

Jamie from Baldwin says:
The photo caption is wrong- that is not an Acela Express train, that is a Northeast Regional.
Nov. 14, 2011, 9:03 am
Willie Green from Cypress, TX says:
Although the NE Corridor has the population density for high speed rail, the esisting infrastructure density also makes that technology very difficult, complex and expensive to deploy.

It may not be the wisest allocation of our assets to dump further investment into the NE corridor when it is already profitable. Passenger rail upgrades in other regions of the nation could push their ridership above the "break even point" with less investment required. Then those profits could be used to help reduce national subsidies and pursue HSR in the NE corridor at a later time.
Nov. 14, 2011, 9:24 am

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not TimesLedger.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to TimesLedger.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

CNG: Community Newspaper Group